How To: The Top 5 Home Remedies for Treating Poison Ivy and Poison Oak Rashes

Summer's here, and that means a lot of us are going to be taking some time off to enjoy the great outdoors. Unfortunately, that also means a lot of us are going to be accidentally running face first into some poison ivy or oak. Instead of suffering through the itch though, why not leave prepared with some easy, homemade remedies to combat that urushiol? Medicated Body Powder / Rubbing Alcohol

How To: Use Diagonal Lashings to tie poles together

Diagonal lashings are a popular type of knot for building structures with wooden poles that allows you to join two poles at a 45-90 degree angle. It can replace a square lashing, but not vice versa. This video will show you how to tie a diagonal lashing yourself, which can be used in all sorts of outdoor construction projects.

How To: Start a fire without kindling

You don't need a stock pile of kindling to hold the flame and really get your fire started. There are a variety of creative yet effective substitutes. Leftover chips from lunch, an extra toilet paper roll, these are only a few ideas on how to start your next fire.

How To: Tie the Miller's Knot (bag or sack knot)

In order to tie a Miller's Knot, which is also known as the bag or sack knot, you should begin by wrapping the rope around the object you wish to bind: the Miller's knot is a binding knot. It is used to bind things. Next, wrap one of the free ends around it. You are, basically, wrapping one end around a second time.

How To: Make an All-Night Campfire with Just One Log

The next time you're out camping, whether it's outdoors in the wilderness or right outside in your own backyard, try this hack out for an effortless campfire all night long. While there is definitely some prep work involved, it's well worth it if you don't need a huge bonfire, and more so if you plan on cooking meals over the flames.

How To: Sharpen a swiss army knife

Learning how to maintain and sharpen your Swiss army knife is an important skill for campers and backpackers. You will need to have a sharpening stone that can be dry or wet. To use a wet stone simply add a little bit of water or homing oil. Keep the blade at an angle of 5 to 7 degrees from the surface of the stone and move the blade back and forth or in a circular motion.

How To: Properly adjust a hiking backpack

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to adjust a hiking backpack. Begin by loosening all the straps on the backpack. Then load the backpack onto yourself. Have the majority weight of the backpack on the hips. Tighten the hip belt and strap it around the hips. Make adjustments on the shoulder straps. Pull down the load lifters. Finish by tighten and connecting the sternum strap. This video will benefit those viewers who are planning to camp and learn how to survive in the wilderness, and ...

How To: Set up a dome tent

This how-to video shows how to set up a Dome tent. Dome tents offer more head room than other styles and are great at withstanding wind. And setting one up is a breeze.

How To: Keep Mosquitoes & Other Annoying Bugs Away from Your Campfire or Backyard Fire Pit

I'll be honest—I've never been a huge fan of camping. It's not that I have anything against nature, I'm just partial to showering and sleeping in my own bed. In fact, the only part of camping I've ever really enjoyed is sitting around a campfire. Outdoor fires are perfect for socializing and cooking hot dogs, but they're also great at helping remove one of camping's biggest annoyances.

How To: Use a square lashing

Square lashing is a knot-making technique that has been made famous by the Boy Scouts of America's massive pioneering projects, and is really integral to any structure made out of poles like the one you see in the thumbnail. This video will teach you how to use square lashing to bind two poles together perpendicular to one another. You will need to know how to tie a clove hitch to make this work.

How To: Tie two ropes together with different knots

For those who didn't learn any knot-tying skills in scouts, or have forgotten them all now, this video demonstration shows how to do knots from basic to more advanced knots such as Sheet Bend, Fisherman's Knot, Square Knot and Thief's Knot. Knot tying is essential for camping, sailing, fishing, and even when you least suspect it. Watch this video camping and outdoor preparation tutorial and learn how to tie two ropes together with several different styles of knots.

How To: Lash a bamboo tripod

In this tutorial, we learn how to lash a bamboo tripod. First, you will tie a clove hitch by taking one piece of bamboo and wrapping the rope around it, then crossing the two sides of the string together to make a hitch. Next, you will secure the clove hitch around the third piece of bamboo. Now, you will rap all the pieces of bamboo together with the rope. Continue to do this until all the pieces feel secure together. Wrap the rope several times around each of the pieces, then wrap it in the...

How To: Hang a bear bag

Backpacker editors demonstrate how to (and how not to) hang a bear bag to protect your food in bruin country. Check out this instructional camping video to ensure you have a safe and fun trip outdoors while camping in serious bear habitats. Learn the various methods of hanging a bear bag with this backpacking tutorial video.

How To: Make a comfy DIY camping chair for less than 5 dollars

Not every camper is looking to totally "rough it" while they are in the woods. In this clip, learn how to make a comfy, folding camping seat out of cheap supplies for less than five bucks! This foam pad is far better than the ones you buy at those expensive camping stores and because you made it yourself, you know it will work. The best part? If you lose it or it gets ruined out there in the wilderness, it was so cheap and easy to make that you can just create another one!

How To: Set up a classic A-Frame tent

There are tons of quick pop up tents available nowadays, but the classic A-Frame tent still remains one of the most popular. A-Frames are those classic tents with the spikes in the ground that hold it up. They take a little more effort to erect but they are perfect for backpacking or short camping trips.

How To: Splice a loop into the end of a three strand rope

Sometimes when you're camping it's necessary to pitch a little something called a tent after a long trek hiking and exploring the great outdoors. And when you're ready to call it a day, make sure you can do so peacefully without the fear that your tent contraption will fall down on you during the middle of the night.

How To: Use the common rope seizing knot

Rope seizing is a technique that is used when two things need to be held together with rope, like two pieces of timber for example. This video from ITS Tactical demonstrates how to use some cord to perform rope seizing on a big, heavy rope so that you can use it to suspend an object or perform other heavy rope-using tasks.

How To: Make a survival belt out of paracord using the cobra knot

All you need is a single long piece (at least fifteen meters) of sturdy paracord, as well as a clasp for either end. You can also use this technique to make a rifle sling or something else for which you will need a long length of woven paracord. The knot itself is not difficult - just watch carefully and make sure you've given yourself enough time to finish this project. A great project to make for yourself, or the survivalist in your life.

How To: Build your own sleeping bag

Learn how to make your own sleeping bag out of roll insulation. This is a redneck or ghetto way of keeping warm without spending hundreds at REI. The industrial insulation will work better than down. This idea has been employed by homeless people and survivalists alike. Enjoy some snowy camping with this uber cheap sleeping bag.

How To: Pack for mountaineering & backpacking trips

In this tutorial, we learn how to pack for mountaineering and backpacking trips. You will need a large backpack that fits your body, then lay out all of your items in front of you. Place your sleeping bag on the bottom of the backpack first, rolling it up tightly. Next, place climbing gear into the backpack and then fuel for the stove. After this, add rope to the bag, then a first aid kit. Next, add in a space blanket and some other clothing items you may need. Next, take a thermal foam pad a...

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