How To: Properly adjust a hiking backpack

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to adjust a hiking backpack. Begin by loosening all the straps on the backpack. Then load the backpack onto yourself. Have the majority weight of the backpack on the hips. Tighten the hip belt and strap it around the hips. Make adjustments on the shoulder straps. Pull down the load lifters. Finish by tighten and connecting the sternum strap. This video will benefit those viewers who are planning to camp and learn how to survive in the wilderness, and ...

How To: Tie the Miller's Knot (bag or sack knot)

In order to tie a Miller's Knot, which is also known as the bag or sack knot, you should begin by wrapping the rope around the object you wish to bind: the Miller's knot is a binding knot. It is used to bind things. Next, wrap one of the free ends around it. You are, basically, wrapping one end around a second time.

How To: Make an All-Night Campfire with Just One Log

The next time you're out camping, whether it's outdoors in the wilderness or right outside in your own backyard, try this hack out for an effortless campfire all night long. While there is definitely some prep work involved, it's well worth it if you don't need a huge bonfire, and more so if you plan on cooking meals over the flames.

How To: Use Diagonal Lashings to tie poles together

Diagonal lashings are a popular type of knot for building structures with wooden poles that allows you to join two poles at a 45-90 degree angle. It can replace a square lashing, but not vice versa. This video will show you how to tie a diagonal lashing yourself, which can be used in all sorts of outdoor construction projects.

How To: Tie two ropes together with different knots

For those who didn't learn any knot-tying skills in scouts, or have forgotten them all now, this video demonstration shows how to do knots from basic to more advanced knots such as Sheet Bend, Fisherman's Knot, Square Knot and Thief's Knot. Knot tying is essential for camping, sailing, fishing, and even when you least suspect it. Watch this video camping and outdoor preparation tutorial and learn how to tie two ropes together with several different styles of knots.

How To: Start a fire without kindling

You don't need a stock pile of kindling to hold the flame and really get your fire started. There are a variety of creative yet effective substitutes. Leftover chips from lunch, an extra toilet paper roll, these are only a few ideas on how to start your next fire.

How To: Keep Mosquitoes & Other Annoying Bugs Away from Your Campfire or Backyard Fire Pit

I'll be honest—I've never been a huge fan of camping. It's not that I have anything against nature, I'm just partial to showering and sleeping in my own bed. In fact, the only part of camping I've ever really enjoyed is sitting around a campfire. Outdoor fires are perfect for socializing and cooking hot dogs, but they're also great at helping remove one of camping's biggest annoyances.

How To: Set up a classic A-Frame tent

There are tons of quick pop up tents available nowadays, but the classic A-Frame tent still remains one of the most popular. A-Frames are those classic tents with the spikes in the ground that hold it up. They take a little more effort to erect but they are perfect for backpacking or short camping trips.

How To: Build a tent footprint

Backpacker magazine shows you how to build a plastic footprint for your tent--a skill taken from the Jan/Feb 2007 issue. Associate editor Jason Stevenson explains the nine steps to create a footprint, including how to cut webbing and punch grommets. Learn more Skills at

How To: Lash a bamboo tripod

In this tutorial, we learn how to lash a bamboo tripod. First, you will tie a clove hitch by taking one piece of bamboo and wrapping the rope around it, then crossing the two sides of the string together to make a hitch. Next, you will secure the clove hitch around the third piece of bamboo. Now, you will rap all the pieces of bamboo together with the rope. Continue to do this until all the pieces feel secure together. Wrap the rope several times around each of the pieces, then wrap it in the...

How To: Use a square lashing

Square lashing is a knot-making technique that has been made famous by the Boy Scouts of America's massive pioneering projects, and is really integral to any structure made out of poles like the one you see in the thumbnail. This video will teach you how to use square lashing to bind two poles together perpendicular to one another. You will need to know how to tie a clove hitch to make this work.

How To: Make a comfy DIY camping chair for less than 5 dollars

Not every camper is looking to totally "rough it" while they are in the woods. In this clip, learn how to make a comfy, folding camping seat out of cheap supplies for less than five bucks! This foam pad is far better than the ones you buy at those expensive camping stores and because you made it yourself, you know it will work. The best part? If you lose it or it gets ruined out there in the wilderness, it was so cheap and easy to make that you can just create another one!

How To: Identify the parts of a compass

The parts of the compass are a base plate with different measurements for calculating mileage and distance. The magnifying glass is used to magnify things on your map. The arrow at the top of the compass is called the direction of travel arrow. To find the degrees on your compass, use the rotating bezel ring, with North being "0", East being "90", South being "180", and west being "270". The magnetic needle inside has a red magnetic north end, which is used to locate "North", and the black en...

How To: Pitch a pop-up tent the easy way

Pop-up tents are much more convenient to pitch than the tents of old, but doing it for the first time is still tricky. Watch this video to learn how to set up both types of pop-up tent: the umbrella style and the coiled-spring style.

How To: Protect food from animals while camping

Getting back to nature can be an incredibly rewarding experience – unless critters come along and ruin it! Here's how to keep your food from being plundered. To keep your food protected while camping out in the great outdoors, try bringing along a cooler, a cloth or nylon sack, a sock, some rope, and sealable, waterproof plastic bags. Keeping your provisions safe will decrease the risk of animal attack, and make your journey out into nature a fun experience.

How To: Set up a tent when camping outdoors

In order to set up a tent, for a camping trip, you'll need to lay out all of the parts of the tent. Place the poles at the end of the tent. Work on opposite sides. Inserting the pole on both sides. It may be easier with two people. Once you insert the pole, then you'll need to snap it, fastening all the snaps. After you have completed this step, lay the fly over the tent. Snap it in place, in all four corners. Make sure that sides are below the mesh. Now, you can stake the tent. Staking the t...

How To: Choose a camping tent

The first advice in this video on how to choose a camping tent is to consider the size of your family. You may want one tent for the whole family or one for the kids and one for the adults. Take time to choose a good camping tent that will last. You may need to spend some money to get a good investment in a tent, one that will last. Do you need the tent for car camping or carry camping? For carry camping you need lightweight materials that will be easy to carry. Large tents may have several r...

How To: Make a wilderness survival shelter

In this how-to video, you will learn how to build a wilderness survival shelter. One thing you can do is use a rain poncho, blanket, or piece of plastic and make a water impermeable shelter with a rope like material. These materials could include anything like a cord or dental floss. You can build a debris hut by using a large stick leaning against a tree. Stack many other sticks around this large stick, and then pile up debris such as dirt or leaves to build up walls. Once the structure is b...

How To: Start a fire with steel wool and a battery

Forget the sticks and drop the matches, Joe Kelley shows you the easiest way to start a fire in the woods: steel wool and a battery. All you need to do is touch the volt battery to the steel wool. Watch this video camping tutorial and learn how to start a fire with steel wool and a battery.

How To: Prepare a survival tin for camping

In order to prepare a survival tin for camping, you will need the following: water purification, condoms, brass wire, a candle, a magnifying glass, waterproof matches, cotton balls, fishing hooks, small compass, whistles, fishing line, and empty tobacco tin, and artificial worms.

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